Author Archives: Cheryl Mitchell

PhD Student Participates in Behavioral and Experimental Economics Workshop

In August 2017, Billur Aksoy, a fifth-year doctoral student, participated in the “PhD Workshop in Behavioral and Experimental Economics” in Lofoten Islands, Norway. The workshop was organized by the Choice Lab at the Norwegian School of Economics. Open by invitation only, workshop attendees presented and discussed their research with senior researchers and fostered new networks and research collaborations. The workshop was followed by the “68 Degrees North Conference on Behavioral Economics.”

Congratulations, Billur!

PhD Student Presents at Social Dilemmas Working Group

In June 2017, Billur Aksoy, a fifth-year experimental economics PhD student, participated in the seventh biennial Social Dilemmas Working Group. The workshop was hosted by the Cleve E. Willis Lab at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Billur presented her research to the group and received invaluable feedback.

The Social Dilemmas Working Group emphasizes using multiple methods (including formal theory; laboratory, field and survey experiments; agent-based modeling; and observational data) and multidisciplinary views. This aids in developing theoretical foundations of behavior in social dilemmas; it also brings together researchers who are interested in human behavior in social dilemmas.

Way to go, Billur!

Texas A&M Experimental Economists Present at 2017 TExAS Meeting

On Saturday, March 11, 2017, members of Texas A&M University’s experimental economics group attended and participated in the fourth annual Texas Experimental Association Symposium (TExAS) Meeting. This year’s TExAS Meeting was held at the University of Texas at Arlington.

Presenters and topics from Texas A&M included:

  • Mackenzie Alston: “The Silver Lining of Unemployment”
  • Noah Bacine: “Overcoming Identity Norms to Break the Glass Ceiling”
  • Catherine Eckel and Rick Wilson (Rice University): “Shopping for Trust”
  • Wei Zhan: “Discrimination and Identity: Using Dictator Games to Gauge Political Preferences”

Congratulations to all of our presenters!